Forum Posts

Jessica McAllister
Nov 12, 2021
In B.O.S.S. Nutrition Forum
“Even just a few spices or ethnic condiments that you can keep in your pantry can turn your mundane dishes into a culinary masterpiece.” -Chef Marcus Samuelsson Your environment plays a huge part in your success toward developing healthy habits. The brain picks up on certain cues in the environment and responds accordingly. For example, if you enter a room in a church, you may tend to start talking in a whisper. Another example relates to shopping. We’ve all seen the decorated end aisles and the appealing displays near the checkout. These elements in a retail environment can cause a person to purchase items simply because they are in plain sight. Your environment also plays a huge role in building healthy nutrition habits. Your pantry, refrigerator, and freezer can collectively be viewed as your home food environment. When you plan your grocery shopping list with your health goals in mind, you can transform your food environment to be more conducive to healthy behavior change. A Tailored Grocery List Research has shown that having too many options can be overwhelming. In general, the more choices we have to make, the less self-control we show when making these choices (2). When you arrive at a typical grocery store, chances are you’ll be faced with an abundance of choices for each item you’re trying to buy. Going to the grocery store with a grocery list tailored to the meals you’re planning on making can help you overcome these challenges. Luckily, my clients have access to EatLove has that option for them! Using the grocery list feature, they can add their chosen recipes to their grocery list and bring that list with them to the store, so they’re always prepared. Healthy Staples Separate from weekly grocery shopping, your home food environment should be well-stocked with certain staple foods at all times. Imagine this: It’s one of those crazy weeknights… you know, when you come home late from work and still have a million little things to do. (We’ve all been there!) You don’t have time to make it to the store, but you still need to come up with a nutritious meal. If you keep your pantry stocked with a variety of canned/dry goods, frozen produce, and exciting spices, you’ll still have plenty of nutritious options to choose from to create a delicious and satisfying dinner. I’ve got some ideas of healthy staples for you below, but everyone is different, so you can always tweak your staples to fit your personal preferences. Produce: Onions, garlic, leafy greens, seasonal fruit (good ones to keep on hand include apples, oranges, bananas, and berries), and seasonal veg (some regular items may include bell peppers, broccoli, and carrots) Protein: Eggs, chicken, turkey, fish, red meat on occasion Canned/Jar Goods: Canned beans, diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, salsa Baking Goods: Flour, breadcrumbs, cooking spray Spices/Condiments: Olive oil, canola oil, salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne pepper, paprika, thyme, rosemary, cumin, oregano, and other spices you enjoy Low-Fat Dairy: Greek yogurt, cheese, milk Nuts, Legumes and Whole Grains: Almonds, peanuts, nut butter, lentils, brown rice, whole wheat pasta/noodles, quinoa, oats, whole wheat bread Frozen Foods: Frozen veggies (such as broccoli and carrots), frozen fruit (such as mixed berries) By having these healthy staples readily available in your environment, you will be more likely to use them. Likewise, by having unhealthy staples in your environment, you may tend to reach for those in a pinch. Having healthy staples is just as important as avoiding unhealthy ones in your environment. FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Once you have all of your ingredients, you can use EatLove’s batch prep feature. You’ll spend less time cooking overall than if you were to prepare multiple different recipes. Less time and effort to eat healthier? That sounds like a win to us! You’ll also save money by ensuring that you use each item you buy from the store, which results in less food wasted. These benefits can really add up in the long run. ASK YOURSELF THIS: Take a peek at your pantry. What kinds of oils do you have? Are you relying primarily on saturated or unsaturated fats? What are your pantry staples? How can they be modified in a healthier direction? Can you switch a refined grain into a whole grain this week (like white rice to brown rice)? TRY THIS: Use EatLove to help build your very own healthy pantry! First, make sure you add your chosen meals to your grocery list. Check your grocery list before you shop and edit it as needed based on what you already have on hand. Unlock all of the features in our platform by signing up for the B.O.S.S. Jump Start program!
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Jessica McAllister
Sep 18, 2021
In B.O.S.S. Nutrition Forum
Hello and welcome, everyone! Welcome to the B.O.S.S. Nutrition Network. I'm looking forward to facilitating this group and getting to know all of you better! Here is a bit about what to expect. I will be checking our forum Monday-Friday. If you post over the weekend, I will make sure to respond Monday morning. Likewise, if you would like to comment on a post from another group member, please feel free to do so. Throughout the week, there will be discussion prompts based on nutrition and wellness info shared in this platform. Feel free to join in and share your thoughts! Lastly, we want this to be a safe environment for all, so please review and adhere to the B.O.S.S. Nutrition Network Community Standards. These can be found below. Developing healthy habits can be tough, but there is strength in working together! Be Kind and Courteous We're all in this together to create a welcoming environment. Let's treat everyone with respect. Healthy debates are natural, but kindness is required. No Hate Speech or Bullying Make sure everyone feels safe. Bullying of any kind isn't allowed, and degrading comments about things like race, religion, culture, sexual orientation, gender or identity will not be tolerated. No Promotions or Spam Give more than you take to this group. Self-promotion, spam and irrelevant links aren't allowed. Respect Everyone's Privacy Being part of this group requires mutual trust. Authentic, expressive discussions make groups great, but may also be sensitive and private. What's shared in the group should stay in the group.
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Jessica McAllister
Aug 17, 2021
In B.O.S.S. Nutrition Forum
Next time you go grocery shopping, add these foods to your list! 1. Apples-An excellent source of fiber(pectin)and Vitamin C, apples may help to reduce LDL (bad) cholesterol. As with other fiber-rich foods, apples are good to have as part of any weight management program. They help you to feel full and may improve bowel function. Apples contain several antioxidants, important in cancer prevention. One medium apple is about 80 calories. An apple a day really could keep the doctor away! 2. Blueberries-Loaded with Vitamins C, E, and others, blueberries are a fruit with one of the highest antioxidant activity. Research suggests that blueberries may have a preventive effect in age-related memory loss and Alzheimer’s disease. Blueberries can promote urinary tract health, similar to cranberries. One cup of blueberries has 84 calories. Next time you forget where your keys are or where you parked your car, eat some blueberries! You may not remember, but you’ll feel better! 3. Cranberries-Cranberries are to bacteria what Kryptonite is to Superman. The “anti-stick”properties of cranberries help promote healthy gums and a urinary tract. These properties prevent bacteria from sticking to these surfaces and making you sick. In addition, cranberries contain antioxidants, which prevent cholesterol from oxidizing and sticking to artery walls. One cup contains about 40 calories. Throw some in a salad or eat them as a snack. 4. Broccoli-These “little trees” pack in a ton of nutrition. Broccoli contains phytochemicals, or plant chemicals, which can slow the aging process and reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. They have been shown to improve lung function, protect against macular degeneration and cataracts, reduce inflammation on associated with allergies, and even reduce the complications associated with diabetes. One cup of chopped broccoli contains about 30 calories. Next time you are on a veggie kick, grab some broccoli. Better yet, grab some even if you aren’t! 5. Watermelon-This refreshing fruit makes an appearance at family reunions across the country every summer. Watermelon contains 92% water, but don’t let that fool you. Watermelon has some powerful properties. Watermelon contains lycopene, which gives it a reddish color. This pigment acts as an antioxidant. Watermelon is also a good source of potassium, preventing muscle cramps. So, eat some after you exercise! Two cups has about 80 calories, so you won’t ruin your work out! 6. Cold water Oily Fish-The name doesn’t sound like something you would want to include in your diet. Maybe it sounds better if they are referred to as salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies and sardines. These are the “must haves” of the meat/protein group. It’s recommended that men and women get 1.1-1.6 grams/day of Omega 3 fatty acids in order to reap the benefits. Three ounces of Atlantic wild or farmed salmon contains about 150 calories AND 1.5-1.8 grams! Imagine if you ate 3 oz of salmon everyday! Your heart would definitely thank you! 7. Grapes-Studies have shown that grapes may support a healthy cardiovascular system by preventing platelet aggregation (which can lead to clot formation), enhancing arterial flexibility and function, reducing inflammation, inhibiting the oxidation of "bad" LDL cholesterol, lowering blood pressure. The green ones have the same properties as the red! 8. Walnuts-Walnuts are one of the best plant sources of protein. They are also rich in fiber, B vitamins, magnesium, and antioxidants such as Vitamin E. Nuts in general are also high in plant sterols and fat -but mostly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, the good ones. These have been shown to lower LDL cholesterol. Walnuts, in particular, have significantly higher amounts of omega 3 fatty acids as compared to other nuts.Throw some in your pancake batter, yogurt or crack some open as a snack. But don’t go crazy, 1 oz, or 14 halves, contains about 185 calories. 9. Kiwifruit-This fruit is actually a berry, a pretty big berry. Also known as the Chinese gooseberry, kiwifruit is also a source of omega 3 fatty acids, one of the few fruit sources. Kiwifruit also contains two times RDA for Vitamin C and about as much potassium asa banana. At about 45-50 calories per fruit, you really can’t go wrong with some kiwifruit in your diet. Cut the top off and dig in with a spoon! 10. Yogurt-The only time you want bacteria in your food is when you eat yogurt! Yogurt contains live bacterial cultures may help you to live longer, and may fortify your immune system. Research studies have shown that increased yogurt consumption, particularly in immunocompromised populations such as the elderly, may enhance the immune response, which would in turn increase resistance to immune-related diseases.Yogurt may also lower LDL (bad) cholesterol, raise HDL (good) cholesterol, prevent stomach ulcers caused by bacteria, and as a good source of calcium, it may help to burn body fat and maintain bone density. Watch out for the sweetened yogurts, they may have too many calories and sugar. Try Greek yogurt (Fage or Chobani brands) or plain yogurt and add honey, walnuts, peaches, blueberries, or strawberries. You’ll get less calories and more protein and cultures!
10 “Must Have” Food for Optimal Nutrition content media
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Jessica McAllister
Aug 17, 2021
In B.O.S.S. Nutrition Forum
Your Goal: Change the Pace •Use the FIT principles to change the pace of your current exercise routine. FIT stands for: Frequency: the number of times you will be doing planned aerobics each week. Intensity: the vigor, or pace, of your aerobics activity. (Measure intensity by rating your exertion on a scale from 0 to 10. Let 0 equal how you feel at rest, while 10 equals how you feel if you were working as hard as possible. A 6 or 7 feels like you’re walking quickly to catch a train; this level of activity is a beneficial challenge to your body.) Time: the duration of your aerobics. Using the FIT Principles to Change Your Exercise Pace Frequency: Change the pace by exercising more frequently. If you take an aerobics class twice a week, start going three or four times per week. Intensity: If your intensity level is lower than a 6 or 7 on the intensity scale, change the pace by switching to activities that require more exertion. Time: Change the pace by spending more time being active. For example, you might increase the length of your workouts by 10%. If you workout 40 minutes at a time, three times per week (120 minutes in a week), add another 12 minutes to the week’s total (12 = 10% of 120). Each of the three weekly sessions would now last 44 minutes. Activities by Intensity Level •Light activities: walking slowly (strolling), cycling (mild effort), golf using a power cart, swimming (slow treading), bowling, light stretching, yoga, beginner pilates •Moderate activities: walking briskly, cycling (moderate effort), golf (pulling a cart or carrying clubs), swimming (moderate effort), doubles tennis, ice skating, aerobic dancing, step aerobics, dance lessons, circuit weight training •Hard/vigorous activities: walking vigorously or briskly uphill, running, cycling fast, spinning classes, swimming (crawl), singles tennis, hiking, cross-country skiing, snowshoe-ing, downhill skiing, skipping rope, kickboxing, stair climber/stepper, or elliptical trainer Resistance Training Basics •You can use exercise machines, free weights, and/or resistance bands for resistance training. With all methods, get instruction on proper technique from an exercise video/DVD, a book, or a personal trainer. •When using free weights: Lift the weight to a count of 2 and lower it to a count of 3 or 4. Breathe normally throughout the exercise. Pick a weight load that you can move for 8 to 12 repetitions (reps). At the end of these reps, your muscles should feel tired. If you can’t do at least 8 reps, the weight is too heavy. If you can easily do more than 12 reps, the weight is too light. You are ready to increase the amount of resistance by 5% to 10%when you can do 12 reps using the correct form and posture. A minimum of one set of 8 to 12 reps, working until the muscle feels tired, is usually enough to see benefits. •Set a goal to exercise each muscle group at least twice a week, with a minimum of two days of rest in between workouts. •Work out in front of a mirror so you can check your form periodically. •Stop if you feel pain! •Carry a water bottle and be sure to drink enough between routines to stay hydrated.
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Jessica McAllister

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